Chemistry (CHEM)

Major Courses

CHEM A105 General Chemistry I Lecture 3 crs.

This course is the first half of a one-year course in the fundamental principles of general chemistry. This is the first chemistry course for all science majors and includes the development of modern atomic theory, chemical bonding and structure, and the nature of matter and physical states. Included is an introduction to thermodynamics and kinetics with a more thorough development of equilibria concepts. Descriptive chemistry is liberally sprinkled throughout the course.

Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in MATH A257
Corequisite: CHEM A107

CHEM A106 General Chemistry II Lecture 3 crs.

This course is a continuation of CHEM A105.

Prerequisites: CHEM A105, CHEM A107
Corequisite:   CHEM A108

CHEM A107 General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 cr.

This lab involves experiments to accompany General Chemistry Lecture. One three-hour laboratory period per week.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: CHEM A105 or co-registration in CHEM A105

CHEM A108 General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 cr.

Same description as CHEM A107. Also includes qualitative analysis.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: CHEM A106, CHEM A107, or coregistration in CHEM A106

CHEM A300 Organic Chemistry I Lecture 3 crs.

In this first semester organic course, students learn the concepts and skills necessary to have a strong foundation in organic chemistry.This course includes: drawing, visualizing, and describing in words the bonding motifs and interactions in organic chemistry; showing how acid base chemistry relates to structure and reactions; applying kinetics and thermodynamics to reactions; showing the mechanistic path for reactions; applying these concepts to functional groups.

Prerequisites: CHEM A105 — A108 or permission of department chair

CHEM A301 Organic Chemistry II Lecture 3 crs.

In this second semester organic course, students build upon the concepts of Organic 1 (A300) This includes: showing the mechanistic path for more advanced reactions; identifying and suggesting reagents, starting materials, and products for multi-step syntheses of organic compounds; writing about scientific topics; using NMR, IR, and Mass spectroscopy to identify organic compounds and applying all of these concepts to functional groups.

Prerequisite: CHEM A300 

CHEM A302 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory for Chemistry Majors 2 crs.

This two-credit-hour laboratory course for chemistry majors accompanies CHEM A300. We combine knowledge with practical skills in this course as we purify, synthesize, and identify organic compounds. Techniques include: acid/base extraction, recrystallization, distillation, organic reactions, IR spectroscopy, refractive index, melting point and NMR. Students learn to keep a lab notebook and to write a formal lab write-up. There are two, three-hour laboratory periods per week.  The lab fee is $100.

Corequisite: CHEM A300 

CHEM A303 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory for Chemistry Majors 2 crs.

This advanced two-credit-hour laboratory in organic chemistry for chemistry majors allows students to use modern spectroscopic methods in conjunction with synthesis to identify and/or determine the structure of organic compounds.  The overall goal of this lab-based course is to increase students’ skills in modern structure determination using IR-, NMR-, UV-Vis- and  Mass-spectroscopy.  Students also employ column chromatography for purification, and gas chromatography for identification.

Prerequisite: CHEM A302 
Corequisite: CHEM A301 

CHEM A305 Organic Chemistry Laboratory  2 crs.

This is the two-credit-hour laboratory course for non-majors. We combine knowledge with practical skills in this course as we purify, synthesize, and identify organic compounds. Techniques include: acid/base extraction, recrystallization, distillation, organic reactions, IR spectroscopy, refractive index, and melting point. Students also learn to keep a lab notebook. There are two, three-hour laboratory periods per week.  The lab fee is $100.

Prerequisite or Corerequisite: CHEM A301 

CHEM A306 Physical Chemistry I Lecture 3 crs.

This course is a general survey of physical chemistry stressing thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics.

Prerequisites: CHEM A105 — A108, CHEM A301, MATH A257, A258, or permission of instructor

CHEM A307 Physical Chemistry II Lecture 3 crs.

This is an advanced course in physical chemistry treating elementary quantum theory and spectroscopy with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics.

Prerequisites: CHEM A105 — A108, CHEM A301, MATH A257- A258, PHYS A110- A111, or permission of instructor

CHEM A310 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory 1 cr.

This is the one-credit-hour laboratory course accompanies CHEM A300, and is only taught in the summer. Loyola Chemistry majors must complete A310 and A311 to fulfill the CHEM-A302 or A305 requirement.

In this course, we combine knowledge with practical skills as we purify, synthesize, and identify organic compounds. Techniques include: acid/base extraction, recrystallization, distillation, and melting point. Students also learn how to keep a lab notebook. There are three-hour laboratory periods four days per week.  The lab fee is $100.

Corequisite: CHEM A300 

CHEM A311 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 1 cr.

This one-credit-hour laboratory course accompanies CHEM A301, and is only taught in the summer. Loyola Chemistry majors must complete A310 and A311 to fulfill the CHEM-A302 or A305 requirement. 

In this course, we combine knowledge with practical skills in this course as we purify, synthesize, and identify organic compounds. Techniques include: organic reactions, recrystallization, IR spectroscopy, refractive index, and melting point. Students also learn how to keep a lab notebook. There are three-hour laboratory periods four days per week.  The lab fee is $100. This course is only taught in the summer.

Corequisite: CHEM A301 

CHEM A315 Introduction to Forensic Methods 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to instrumental and chemical analysis techniques used in forensic investigations. Topics covered may include: serological analysis, fingerprint analysis, soil and glass analysis, hair and fiber analysis, arson/explosive analysis, document analysis, and drug/toxicological analysis. Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: CHEM A300

CHEM A320 Integrated I Laboratory 3 crs.

This is an advanced laboratory with one hour of recitation each week for all chemistry majors. The lecture and experiments cover a wide range of techniques and topics including chemical literature, inorganic synthesis and characterization, photochemistry, titrations, kinetics, extractions, UV-Vis, and chromatography. This laboratory is project-based and requires students to plan and execute experiments involving concepts and techniques from several subdisciplines.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisites: CHEM A301, A303

CHEM A330 Integrated II Laboratory 2 crs.

This course is an advanced chemistry laboratory that involves structural analysis, thermodynamics, chemical separations, electrochemistry, advanced kinetics, and spectroscopy. Classical and modern spectroscopic techniques, such as UV-Vis, FT/IR, Raman and LIF are employed along with molecular modeling techniques. Lab fee $100.

Prerequisites: CHEM A303, A306

CHEM A350 Inorganic I Chemistry 3 crs.

This lecture course introduces students to various topics in inorganic chemistry. The topics covered include atomic structure, symmetry and group theory, introduction to ionic and covalent bonding models in coordination complexes, acid-base theories, aqueous chemistry, electrochemistry, and an introduction to bioinorganic chemistry.

Prerequisite: CHEM A301

CHEM A400 Biochemistry I Lecture 3 crs.

This course is a detailed study of the structure and function of the major classes of biological macromolecules: proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and sugars. Physical, chemical, experimental, and mechanistic aspects of macromolecules and their behavior are emphasized based on an understanding of the underlying principles of bonding, equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Topics covered include protein structure and folding, experimental methods used to characterize and manipulate proteins and DNA, allostery and other types of regulation, molecular disease, enzyme mechanism and inhibition, and membranes.

Prerequisite: CHEM A301

CHEM A401 Biochemistry II Lecture 3 crs.

This course is a thorough coverage of metabolism and metabolic regulation. It begins with a brief review and expanded treatment of concepts from the first semester course of particular relevance to the study of metabolism such as energetics, membranes and membrane transport, receptors, and enzymes and their regulation. Topics covered include vitamins and cofactors, glycolysis, TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, glycogen metabolism, gluconeogenesis, photosynthesis, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids, amino acids, and nucleotides. Emphasis is placed on understanding the chemical conversions involved, the interplay between various metabolic processes, and on understanding a variety of metabolic diseases.

Prerequisites: CHEM A400

CHEM A402 Techniques in Biochemistry 1 cr.

Students perform selected chemical and instrumental techniques based on lecture material covered in CHEM A400. Topics include: methods to label or sequence proteins, optical methods, NMR spectroscopy, enzyme kinetics and inhibition, column chromatography, introduction to basic molecular biology methods, and acrylamide and agarose gel electrophoresis.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisites: CHEM A400

CHEM A415 Instrumental Analysis 4 crs. 

This combined lecture/lab course develops the principles of instrumental analysis.  Students learn advanced principles of electrochemical, spectrochemical, and chromatographic analysis.  Laboratory components provide hands-on training.  Topics include instrumentation, sample preparation, data analysis, and recent developments in analytical techniques, with a focus on applications in industry and graduate academic labs. Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: CHEM A320 

CHEM A425 Forensic Instrumental Analysis  4 crs.

This combined lecture/lab course applies the principles of instrumental analysis to forensic chemistry.  Students learn advanced principles of electrochemical, spectrochemical, and chromatographic analysis.  Laboratory components provide hands-on training.  Topics include instrumentation, sample preparation, data analysis, and recent developments in analytical techniques, with a focus on forensic chemistry applications.

Prerequisites: CHEM A320, CHEM A315, FRSC-C201 

CHEM A493 Capstone Presentation 1 cr.

This course is designed to strengthen the student’s oral and writing skills in technical communication. A secondary objective is to practice skills retrieving data from the chemical literature in both written and electronic form. The course requires one paper and one oral presentation at the departmental seminar.

Prerequisite: CHEM A303, A320, or permission of instructor

CHEM A495 Special Project credits vary

This course focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

CHEM A496 Seminar/Workshop credits vary

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

CHEM A497 Internship/ Practicum credits vary

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

CHEM A498 Research credits vary

All majors are encouraged to, and honors program students must, register for one to three credit hours for each semester starting with the second semester of their sophomore years for a total of four credit hours. Credit will be prorated on the basis of one credit hour for four hours devoted to research.

Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson.

CHEM A499 Independent Study credits vary

CHEM H295 Chemistry Honors Seminar 3 crs.

University Honors Program

Topics vary.

Introductory Common Curriculum

SCIE T129 Investigating Nature 3 crs.

Introductory Common Curriculum: Natural Science

This team-taught interdisciplinary course examines how scientists learn about the natural world through the process of scientific discovery. Students learn critical thinking skills that scientists regularly engage in, and demonstrate this through classroom exercises and assignments. Students will learn how methods such as mathematical modeling, observation, and field and laboratory experimentation are used to discover new information about a specific scientific topic. Topics covered by the professors may or may not be thematically linked.

This course replaces BIOL T122, CHEM T122, PHYS T122

Advanced Common Curriculum

CHEM J220  Chemistry and Technology  1 cr.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Natural Science in Context

This course allows students to gain an appreciation for the advances in material science that drive new technologies by exposing students, in a hands-on laboratory setting, to the chemistry underlying transformative technologies both ancient and modern.  Students participate in a range of chemistry experiments like smelting bronze, synthesizing biofuels, separating dyes via gel electrophoresis, making stained glass, extracting pigments from plants, and anodizing rare earth metals.

Prerequisites: SCIE T129 

CHEM J245 Chemistry and Art   3 cr.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Natural Science in Context

This course represents an integration of materials concerning both Fine arts and Chemistry. It discusses the synergistic relationship between the development of chemical processes and their effects on the methods of artistic production. In pursuit of this goal, this course integrates the Chemical principles of matter and energy with the techniques and experiences of Art.

Prerequisites: SCIE T129 

CHEM J246 Chemistry and Art Studio   1 cr.

Advanced Common Curriculum: Natural Science in Context

This common-curriculum laboratory course represents an integration of materials concerning both Fine arts and Chemistry.  Activities are designed to allow the student to experience the synergistic relationship between the development of chemical processes and their effects on the methods of artistic production. In pursuit of this goal, this course integrates the chemical principles of matter and energy with the techniques and experiences of art.

Prerequisites: SCIE T129 
Corequisite:   CHEM J245 

CHEM Z130 World Food and Nutrition 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences

This course is a survey of nutritional requirements of Homo sapiens and a historical review of how male and female members of the species have met these requirements, individually and collectively. This historical review serves as a background for intensive discussion of the modern world food situation and possible future solutions.

Prerequisites: SCIE T129
This course fulfills an Advanced Common Curriculum requirement for students who began thier program of study before fall semester 2013.  This course does not satisfy requirements for the 2013-2014 Common Curriculum.